Posts Tagged: #showyourwork

First thoughts on @FiftyThree’s fantastic new #Mix

With FiftyThree’s new Mix launch today I am already starting to think how might I draw my sketchnotes in such a way that I am not merely sharing them–I’ve been doing that for a while on Pinterest–but so I am actually inviting collaboration. I mean, how would I capture a keynote presentation, for example, while leaving room for others to add their sketches?

It’s more challenging than it sounds: I can easily capture what I learn from the keynote and almost as easily leave room for what I know I don’t know–a point I missed or term that needs defining or elaborating, for example. But how do I leave room for what I don’t know I don’t know–those infamous unknown unknowns? Where do I leave space? I think that instead of seeing my notes as a sort of record, I have to see them as an invitation. What does that look like?

I don’t even have to answer that question to appreciate how it shifts our idea of knowledge itself from something like a collection of discrete facts, passed on like objects, to something that is much fuzzier and uncertain and malleable, and socially constructed.

[Update]

Maeda on Gardner

@JohnMaeda sent this out Sep. 16. How do I draw a set of notes that says I am interested? If I captured notes as questions, would that work? That’s an interesting idea, now that I think about it: what if we asked students (and ourselves) to write questions, instead of the usual trivial data they capture. I will try that and post the outcome.

Simple visualization of a year

I keep both a logbook and a “thinkbook”, calling them Past and Present & Future respectively, for clocking the day’s events and for thinking out loud to myself. Here, above, is my logbook, tagged using a hack posted by @brainpickings and sent to me yesterday by my friend @amyburvall, who knows I like all things paper. (Thanks ladies!)

Each coloured flash is keyed to an index of tags in the back of the logbook. The top row of red marks, for example, notes the times I’ve eaten out, whether that’s a coffee and muffin at an airport Starbucks or (a perfect) lunch at Jean Georges’ in New York.

I flip through my logbook often, getting know my days again, and I was delighted to see, really see, my year in a new way after applying the hack. The pattern of tags is curious to me and pretty.  And I was really surprised to be able to see the break between past and future so clearly.

There on left are those days gone by, days well thumbed and messy, and, in fact, still expanding each time I turn back the pages. For old statues and ancient stone stairs, the patina of age is patina of subtraction–a little more is worn away with each passing hand or footfall. But for a journal, the patina of age is an accretion or a filling in of memory and meaning.

On the right, tomorrow’s empty pages pack tightly, as though some sort of temporal Venturi was working where the black ribbon of the bookmark divides then and next. Or maybe the past is compressing the future, like sound waves piling up ahead of a fast moving jet. Here, looking at the year along its edge, I don’t know if these future days are empty and waiting to be filled, or waiting to be revealed. Isn’t that delightful.

Wrapping up my reading of Kleon’s #showyourwork

How to draw better sketchnotes

 

early sketchnote

Here’s what my sketchnotes looked like when I first picked up Paper from @FiftyThree, tow years ago.

Here’s what I’m doodling these days

dinolove

I’m sharing this for two reasons:

  1. To show that anyone can learn to draw. When I run a sketchnote workshop a number of people will say to me, “You can sketchnote because you can draw.” Well, that’s true, but it is a learned skill. The most liberating thing I did was to start posting my drawings on social media. I had to get rid of a vicious internal editor, you know, that voice that says, “You’re not good enough,” “She’s better than you.”  It wasn’t until I trashed that troll that I could start to get better at drawing.
  2. To show the value of keeping a journal of some sort. I have a shelf of paper journals and diaries (I currently carry two everywhere, one  for logging my day and one thinking) and a growing collection of material archived on the web, such as the Simple Diary of My Days, my Wunderkammern and, for my sketchnotes, my Pinterest board. The timescale of day-to-day is too short to see changes that come incrementally, like skill development. So it’s satisfying to open a diary, analog or digital, and see that maybe I’m not great but I am certainly better than I was two years ago. A diary is good insurance against being too hard on ourselves.

Oh, and if you were wondering how to draw mechanically speaking, get a copy of Mike Rohde’s, Sketchnote Handbook, Even without my troll I still certainly needed some instruction and Rohde’s book was the one I found most useful. I return to it often.

sketchnote handbook

My todo list, after reading @austinkleon #showyourwork 57 #100xconvos

p. 216

 

I am reading @austinkleon‘s new book, Show Your Work, and in the spirit of the title, I’ve decided to show that reading. Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting shots of my marginalia–my conversation with Austin Kleon. It’s not page by page, but by every page where I’ve scribbled a few words or doodled a picture. It’s my half of a conversation with Kleon. For the other half, you’ll have to buy his book and read along. (It is well worth it and so far one of the best books on education I’ve read in the past 12 months.)

Treat beginnings like endings. Reading @austinkleon #showyourwork 56 #100xconvos cc @dianakimball

p. 199

Diana Kimball, who works at Soundcloud, on No More Forever Projects.

I am reading @austinkleon‘s new book, Show Your Work, and in the spirit of the title, I’ve decided to show that reading. Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting shots of my marginalia–my conversation with Austin Kleon. It’s not page by page, but by every page where I’ve scribbled a few words or doodled a picture. It’s my half of a conversation with Kleon. For the other half, you’ll have to buy his book and read along. (It is well worth it and so far one of the best books on education I’ve read in the past 12 months.)

On to the next (happy) pipe dream. Reading @austinkleon #showyourwork 55 #100xconvos

p. 198

I am reading @austinkleon‘s new book, Show Your Work, and in the spirit of the title, I’ve decided to show that reading. Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting shots of my marginalia–my conversation with Austin Kleon. It’s not page by page, but by every page where I’ve scribbled a few words or doodled a picture. It’s my half of a conversation with Kleon. For the other half, you’ll have to buy his book and read along. (It is well worth it and so far one of the best books on education I’ve read in the past 12 months.)

Become a student again. Reading @austinkleon #showyourwork 54 #100xconvos

p. 197

 

That means you have to shut up and listen.

I am reading @austinkleon‘s new book, Show Your Work, and in the spirit of the title, I’ve decided to show that reading. Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting shots of my marginalia–my conversation with Austin Kleon. It’s not page by page, but by every page where I’ve scribbled a few words or doodled a picture. It’s my half of a conversation with Kleon. For the other half, you’ll have to buy his book and read along. (It is well worth it and so far one of the best books on education I’ve read in the past 12 months.)

If you never go to work, you never get to leave work. Reading @austinkleon #showyourwork 53 #100xconvos

p. 194

I am reading @austinkleon‘s new book, Show Your Work, and in the spirit of the title, I’ve decided to show that reading. Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting shots of my marginalia–my conversation with Austin Kleon. It’s not page by page, but by every page where I’ve scribbled a few words or doodled a picture. It’s my half of a conversation with Kleon. For the other half, you’ll have to buy his book and read along. (It is well worth it and so far one of the best books on education I’ve read in the past 12 months.)

Take a sabbatical. Reading @austinkleon #showyourwork 52 #100xconvos

p. 191

I am reading @austinkleon‘s new book, Show Your Work, and in the spirit of the title, I’ve decided to show that reading. Over the next few weeks I’ll be posting shots of my marginalia–my conversation with Austin Kleon. It’s not page by page, but by every page where I’ve scribbled a few words or doodled a picture. It’s my half of a conversation with Kleon. For the other half, you’ll have to buy his book and read along. (It is well worth it and so far one of the best books on education I’ve read in the past 12 months.)